rrsp

Tick Tock: RRSP Season is Here!

I am continually amazed at the number of people, who have high incomes and savings, that fail to take full advantage of the preferential tax treatment of RRSPs versus other types of investment or savings accounts. This is especially true for business owners who often have retained earnings in their corporations while also having massive amounts, sometimes $50,000 or more, in unused RRSP contribution room.

Getting the Most from your RRSP

Since its inception several decades ago, the Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) has become the most widely used retirement savings vehicle in Canada. In order to get the most from an RRSP, it is essential to plan ahead for future investments to avoid panicked deadline decisions or taking action without fully understanding the long-term impact.

In this article we examine a number of different RRSP savings strategies:

RRSP Income Options

Let us discuss a scenario that faces a high number of retirees and soon-to-be-retirees all over the country. You have spent years saving for your retirement and you have made smart decisions about using the power of RRSPs to accumulate a significant nest egg.

Strategies to Enhance Your RRSPs

Since their introduction in 1957 as an incentive to save for retirement, Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) have evolved into the most popular savings vehicles in Canada. All too often, though, RRSP decisions are made in a panic to meet a deadline, with little or no planning or understanding of the effects of our actions.

Here are a few top strategies to help you get the most from your RRSP and retirement plans:

Registered Retirement Savings Plan

A Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) is a retirement plan that is registered with the federal government and that you or your spouse or common-law partner can establish and contribute into until the end of the year when the plan holder turns 71.

Deductible RRSP contributions can be used to reduce your tax. Any income you earn in the RRSP is exempt from tax for the time the funds remain in the plan. However, you generally have to pay tax when you cash in or receive payments from the plan.

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